Plastic Ocean Pollution Solutions Summit

February 24 2015

The facts about plastic ocean pollution are disturbing; the most recent research says that 4.8 to 12.7 million tons of plastic makes its way from land into our oceans every single year. But with this new information comes a wave of solutions for combatting the problem, so we -- along with the youth participating in the Plastic Ocean Pollution Solutions (POPS) Leadership Summit -- are focusing on that. 

This Friday, February, 27th, ninety students ranging in age from 11 to 18 will gather for this three-day intensive summit. The purpose of the summit is to "provide students with a real-life skill set to take out into the world," according to a POPs press release. It goes on to explain: "Workshops include hands-on scientific analysis of coastal seawater while aboard the Ocean Institute and Algalita research vessels. Students will have the chance to take their leadership and public speaking skills up a notch; and explore the use of art, filmmaking and social media as community engagement tools. 

The students will be in good hands for this conscious-raising effort. This year’s team of experts and workshop leaders includes: Beth Terry, author of “My Plastic Free Life”; New York Times best selling author, scientist and ocean conservation enthusiast, Dr. Wallace “J” Nichols; Executive Director and co-founder of 5-Gyres Institute, Anna Cummins; Youth eco-conscious-raising powerhouses Danni Washington and Jordan Howard; and of course Captain Charles Moore himself, who last year won the Peter Benchley Ocean “Hero of the Seas” Award, and whose best-selling book “Plastic Ocean” is bringing worldwide attention to the phenomenon."

We're excited to contribute to this movement of education and change by providing all participants at the summit with a plastic-free solution! Klean Kanteen stainless steel pints will be given to all event attendees for use during (and after) the summit. 

Want to know more? Learn about the summit and stay up to date with new information here